The Cholesterol Debate (Part 2 of 3)

Dr Jacques E Rossouw

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Parts: (1) Noakes | (2) Rossouw | (3) Question & Answers

Dr Jacques Rossouw, MB.ChB., F.C.P. (S.A.), M.D. shares his views during the "The Great Centenary Debate" at the University of Cape Town's Faculty of Health Sciences. The debate was a showdown between Noakes and Dr Jacques Rossouw on the topic "Cholesterol is an important factor for heart disease and current dietary recommendations are warranted". Download Dr Rossouw's Power Point Presentation.

Dr. Rossouw is the chief of the Women's Health Initiative, established in 1991 by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute at the National Institutes of Health to address the most common causes of death, disability and impaired quality of life in postmenopausal women.

The WHI is comprised of a set of clinical trials and observational studies involving over 161,000 post-menopausal women investigating risk factors and testing prevention strategies for heart disease, cancers of the breast and the large bowel, and fractures due to osteoporosis in women. The WHI is one of the largest U.S. prevention studies of its kind.

Prior to joining the NHLBI in 1989, Dr. Rossouw served as the director of the National Research Institute for Nutritional Diseases of the South African Medical Research Council, where he was responsible for launching the Coronary Risk Factor Study (CORIS), a community prevention trial.

Dr. Rossouw graduated from the University of Cape Town in South Africa, where he studied internal medicine and hepatology. He is the author or coauthor of more than 150 articles and book chapters on a variety of topics, including postmenopausal hormone therapy and cardiovascular disease, lipids, nutrition, and community intervention studies. Areas of expertise: examination of epidemiologic and clinical trial data on postmenopausal hormone therapy, lipids and other biomarkers, and coronary heart disease


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