Vitamin B-2

Riboflavin

Functions

  • used in metabolism of fats, carbohydrates, and protein for production of energy
  • formation of certain enzymes and in cellular oxidation
  • normal growth
  • production of red blood cells
  • health of skin, mucous membranes, and eyes

Deficiency

Mild

  • impaired growth
  • lassitude and weakness
  • cracks and sores on corner of mouth (cheilosis ) and tongue (glossitis)
  • red eyes
  • lesions and atrophy of skin
  • sensitivity to light (photophobia)
  • cataracts
  • dizziness
  • hair loss
  • inability to sleep (insomnia)
  • poor digestion
Severe (rare)
  • anemia
  • nerve disease

Characteristics

  • water-soluble
  • alcohol-soluble
  • not destroyed by heat in cooking unless with alkali
  • unstable in light, especially in presence of alkali

Good Sources

Vitamin B-2

Natural

  • eggs
  • green vegetables
    • broccoli, spinach, turnup greens, asparagus, etc.
  • lean meat, liver, kidney
  • milk and dairy products
  • beans
  • nuts
Food Quantity mg
Chicken 3 oz 0.10
Bagel 1 medium 0.33
Milk, whole 1 cup 0.40
Spinach, cooked 1/2 cup 0.42

Artificial

  • wheat germ
  • dried yeast
  • enriched foods

Recommended Daily Allowances (RDA)

  • Males (11 yrs. and older)
    • 1.3 mg
    • 1.4-1.8 mg
  • Females (11 yrs. and older)
    • 1.1 mg
    • 1.2-1.3 mg
  • Pregnant females
    • 1.6 mg
  • Lactating females
    • 1.7-1.8 mg
  • Children
    • 0.8-1.2 mg
  • Infants
    • 0.4-0.5 mg
  • Varied values reflect different references

Tolerable Upper Intake Levels (UL)

  • Adults (19 to 50 yrs)
    • not yet determined
  • Generally considered nontoxic
  • Intakes above UL may lead to negative health consequences

Supplementation

  • Not necessary, not recommended
  • Others recommend 25-300 mg daily
  • Best taken with vitamin B complex and vitamin C

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