German Volume Training

Ask or answer questions, discuss and express your views

Moderators: Ironman, Jungledoc, darshana, stuward

Post Reply
msdaniel924
former lurker
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2018 9:23 am

German Volume Training

Post by msdaniel924 » Thu Jul 05, 2018 3:50 am

I've been looking at German Volume Training to switch up from my 3X Full Body routine for a while because I like to alternate between high volume and high intensity. The only thing that bothers me is that there doesn't seem to be enough exercises to hit every movement. There's only a limited number you can do otherwise you would be in the gym all day but it's generally 2 main exercises of 10 sets of 10 reps (Bench Press/Pulldowns etc.) Then 2 supplementary exercises which is 3 sets of 10-12 (Rows, Lateral Raises, Curls etc.) This program really interests me but I don't think it's possible on a 3 day split to do Squats AND Deadlifts which I think is essential.

Is there anyone else that's tried this before? If so how did you go about it and how did you find it?

Kenny Croxdale
Powerlifting Ninja
Powerlifting Ninja
Posts: 1118
Joined: Sun Dec 24, 2006 10:36 am

Re: German Volume Training

Post by Kenny Croxdale » Thu Jul 05, 2018 6:52 am

msdaniel924 wrote:
Thu Jul 05, 2018 3:50 am
I've been looking at German Volume Training to switch up from my 3X Full Body routine for a while because I like to alternate between high volume and high intensity. The only thing that bothers me is that there doesn't seem to be enough exercises to hit every movement. There's only a limited number you can do otherwise you would be in the gym all day but it's generally 2 main exercises of 10 sets of 10 reps (Bench Press/Pulldowns etc.) Then 2 supplementary exercises which is 3 sets of 10-12 (Rows, Lateral Raises, Curls etc.) This program really interests me but I don't think it's possible on a 3 day split to do Squats AND Deadlifts which I think is essential.

Is there anyone else that's tried this before? If so how did you go about it and how did you find it?
Yes

Yes, I have perform German Volume Training in the past. I also use a modified version of it for my Hypertrophy Training Days.

Limited Number of Exercises

The Volume combined with the Intensity in performing 10 Sets for 10 Reps with only 60 second rest period between upper body exercise and up to 90 for lower body exercise suck the life out of you, when executed correctly.

IF you have any energy left after performing a German Volume Set of let's say Squat, that means you did NOT did not essentially perform them correctly.

So, you clearly don't completely understand the German Volume Training Protocol. With that said, let drill down deep to give you a better on this.

"High Intensity Interval Resistance Training"

German Volume Training falls in to the category of "High Intensity Interval Resistance Training".

"High Intensity Interval Resistance Training" equates to "High Intensity Interval Cardio Training" that is preformed with all out sprints. All out effort "Sprints" be it with running, biking, or with resistance/weights.

As Vince Gironda, a very good Bodybuilder and a great Bodybuilding Coach, once said...

"You can train long or hard but not both.'

There is an inverse relationship between Intensity and time.

When intensity goes up, time goes down.

When intensity goes down, time goes up.

The Take Home Message

1) The number of exercise in a German Volume Training Program: When preformed correctly, is "Self Limiting". IF you have gone all out for 10 Sets of 10 Reps "Sprints" with let's say Squat, walking is a chore, let along doing more leg work or even upper body work.

2) Exercise Order: The order you perform your exercises in, play a huge role in the progress you make with muscle groups. You energy level is highest for your first exercise. Thus, you will obtain the most gains with your first exercise.

You have less energy for you second exercise, even it it works a different muscle group. Thus, the progress you make with the second exercise will be less than with the first.

If you perform, let's say 5 exercise, in a training program. The 5th exercise, as the saying goes, is going to "Suck hind tit"; you aren't going to obtain the same results from it as the 5th exercise that you would have if it was the 1st exercise.

Recommendation

1) Alternate Upper/Lower Body Training: This enable train a particular muscle group with greater intensity.

Training could be be as follows with a Three Day Alternating Prorgram...

Week 1

Monday: Legs/Back

Wednesday: Upper Body Push Pull

Friday: Legs/Back

Week 2:

Monday: Upper Body Push/Pull

Wednesday: Legs/Back

Friday: Upper Body Push/Pull

Upper Body Push/Pull

A variation of German Volume Training that is effective at working agonist/antagonist muscle group in the same program is Dr Doug Crist Growth "Hormone Synergism Training Program"'; based on his PhD dissertation.

As an example, a set of the Bench Press is alternated with Bent Over Rows. That means you preform the Bench Press for 10 Reps, rest a minute, perform, Bent Over Rows for 10 Reps X 10 Sets for each.

The working muscle is the agonist. The resting muscle is the antagonist. That means when the agonist is working the antagonist is resting.

Working the "Pushing Muscle" in the Bench Press give the "Pulling Muscles" in the Bent Over Row time to recovery.

Working the "Pulling Muscles" in the Bent Over Row give the "Pushing Muscle" in the Bench Press time to recovery.

That is not case with Lower Body Compound Exercise. It has to do with...

Lombard's Paradox

With lower body Compound Exercises, that agonist and antagonist muscle work in unison, as a team.

As an example. while Squatting is a Quad-Glute Dominate Movement. However, the Hamstrings still work during the Squat.

A Deadlift is a Hamstring-Glute Dominate Movement. However, the Quads still work during the Deadlift.

Super Setting Squat with Deadlifts means the agonist and antagonist muscle are working non-stop.

Thus, a more effective method would be to perform Squat first, then Deadlifts.

Since the Quads were trashed in the Squat, you might consider taking them out of the Deadlift, via performing Straight (slight break in knees) Deadlifts or Back Extensions.

Resistance Progression

As with any new training program, it better to start off with exceptionally light load and ease into it, rather than start with too heavy a load.

Kenny Croxdale
Thanks TimD.

Post Reply